MIPS code, 저는 너무 바빠요!

I’m so busy this semester. Five modules at once, lots of assignments, and we’re already so far into the second semester. I want to post a few updates on what I’m up to, I just need to tie up a few loose ends before I have anything decent to show to…whoever is reading this.

Anyhow, I thought it was about time I uploaded the MIPS assembly code for the first console development assignment from last semester, so I’ll be dropping in a link below and amending this page with one too.

Check out that page if you want any information about the project, or click here to see the assembly code. If you have MARS then you’ll be able to run the demo, unlike my snake game which crashed unless you could be bothered to look up the threading issue in the Keyboard and Display Simulator included with MARS, and fix it, like me and my friend did one fateful night.

While the demo may not be too impressive, and there aren’t many drawing functions, writing PrimLib was great challenge. I really enjoyed my time spent with assembly programming – optimizing things at such a low level is surprisingly compelling, implementation of the logic forces concentration, and I generally found the whole experience quite relaxing (except for the debugging – that was horrifying, but still kind of fun).

The greatest thing about my work in MIPS was that it was directly relevant to my work in Introduction to 3D Graphics at the time, where I also had to write Cohen-Sutherland line clipping and Bresenham’s algorithms in C++. It may surprise you to know that I wrote the Cohen Sutherland algorithm in MIPS first, then converted it to C++. Honestly, I might not mind working in assembly professionally if the opportunity ever arose, and my desire to throw down some 6502 for the NES is still as strong as ever.

[Assembly Code]

Enough about that though. I want to give a quick shout out to one of my current time-holes and then head back to more important matters.

Ever heard of Lang-8? If you’re learning a language at an intermediate or advanced level, Lang-8 could be an incredible way to boost your motivation, confidence, and get accurate corrections for real, native speakers. The site is free to use, and relies solely on the kindness of others. Simply put, you make an account, tell it what language you speak, and what you’re learning, then post entries about whatever you like in the language you’re learning. Random strangers from around the globe (preferably native speakers) then post corrections and comments on your entry, and the site even attempts to match you with your language counterparts and suggest friends.

I’ve been using Lang-8 to practice my Korean, even though I’m at a very basic level. There are a lot of Korean people on there learning English and, it seems, not many the other way round, so I’ve been inundated with friend requests. Although I’ve only found time and energy to post three entries of my own, I’ve found crawling and correcting other people’s entries to be almost as addictive as crawling YouTube – albeit in a more altruistic way…

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