London Posting

So a couple of months ago I made this post about what I planned to do with my summer. Well, summer was shorter and busier than I thought it might be, so my best laid plans kind of fell to pieces. I don’t mind of course – I found a decent placement for the year after all – but the chaos that’s dominated the last month or so has left me kind of disorientated.

So where do I stand? I’m in London now, working full-time for a company named ‘Feral Interactive‘, and have just come off of a three-week stint without internet, during which I’ve walked too many miles, watched too many TV series, and played too much Ys. Before that, and before all of the effort that went into arranging the move, I did manage to get through those WebGL tutorials, read a good deal of the Python documentation, and dig through the internet in search of information about network programming for games (without much luck). Mostly though, I just studied Korean and house-hunted. I also bought a small graphics tablet – a Wacom Bamboo Pen and Touch – but I’ve had no time to look into digital art, so I’ve barely gotten used to controlling the thing.

The apartment I have here is small, but nice. It’s essentially two rooms with an entrance down a back-alley – what would be the kitchen-bathroom extension on a terraced. I don’t really spend much time here, what with my working hours, but what I do spend here is comfortable. Once I’m settled I want to get to work on the things that got put off this summer. I’m four chapters in on this maths book, but I’ve yet to get around to doing any OpenGL programming and still haven’t regained any confidence in drawing. To be honest I’ve also considered just taking advantage of the Korean presence down here in London – making language study my extra-curricular priority for the year. Work is tiring, life is complicated. Time will tell.

Right now, I’m watching 원스 어폰 어 타임 임 생초리 (Once Upon a Time in Saengchori). Next? Maybe I’ll hammer out another chapter of this maths book.

Something smells good. I think I live next door to a takeaway.

MIPS code, 저는 너무 바빠요!

I’m so busy this semester. Five modules at once, lots of assignments, and we’re already so far into the second semester. I want to post a few updates on what I’m up to, I just need to tie up a few loose ends before I have anything decent to show to…whoever is reading this.

Anyhow, I thought it was about time I uploaded the MIPS assembly code for the first console development assignment from last semester, so I’ll be dropping in a link below and amending this page with one too.

Check out that page if you want any information about the project, or click here to see the assembly code. If you have MARS then you’ll be able to run the demo, unlike my snake game which crashed unless you could be bothered to look up the threading issue in the Keyboard and Display Simulator included with MARS, and fix it, like me and my friend did one fateful night.

While the demo may not be too impressive, and there aren’t many drawing functions, writing PrimLib was great challenge. I really enjoyed my time spent with assembly programming – optimizing things at such a low level is surprisingly compelling, implementation of the logic forces concentration, and I generally found the whole experience quite relaxing (except for the debugging – that was horrifying, but still kind of fun).

The greatest thing about my work in MIPS was that it was directly relevant to my work in Introduction to 3D Graphics at the time, where I also had to write Cohen-Sutherland line clipping and Bresenham’s algorithms in C++. It may surprise you to know that I wrote the Cohen Sutherland algorithm in MIPS first, then converted it to C++. Honestly, I might not mind working in assembly professionally if the opportunity ever arose, and my desire to throw down some 6502 for the NES is still as strong as ever.

[Assembly Code]

Enough about that though. I want to give a quick shout out to one of my current time-holes and then head back to more important matters.

Ever heard of Lang-8? If you’re learning a language at an intermediate or advanced level, Lang-8 could be an incredible way to boost your motivation, confidence, and get accurate corrections for real, native speakers. The site is free to use, and relies solely on the kindness of others. Simply put, you make an account, tell it what language you speak, and what you’re learning, then post entries about whatever you like in the language you’re learning. Random strangers from around the globe (preferably native speakers) then post corrections and comments on your entry, and the site even attempts to match you with your language counterparts and suggest friends.

I’ve been using Lang-8 to practice my Korean, even though I’m at a very basic level. There are a lot of Korean people on there learning English and, it seems, not many the other way round, so I’ve been inundated with friend requests. Although I’ve only found time and energy to post three entries of my own, I’ve found crawling and correcting other people’s entries to be almost as addictive as crawling YouTube – albeit in a more altruistic way…